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Standard

Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) Operating Characteristics and User Interface

2020-10-12
WIP
J2399
Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is an enhancement of conventional cruise control systems that allows the ACC-equipped vehicle to follow a forward vehicle at a pre-selected time gap, up to a driver selected speed, by controlling the engine, power train, and/or service brakes. This SAE Standard focuses on specifying the minimum requirements for ACC system operating characteristics and elements of the user interface. This document applies to original equipment and aftermarket ACC systems for passenger vehicles (including motorcycles). This document does not apply to heavy vehicles (GVWR > 10,000 lbs. or 4,536 kg). Furthermore, this document does not address other variations on ACC, such as “stop & go” ACC, that can bring the equipped vehicle to a stop and reaccelerate. Future revisions of this document should consider enhanced versions of ACC, as well as the integration of ACC with Forward Vehicle Collision Warning Systems (FVCWS).
Standard

Blind Spot Monitoring System (BSMS): Operating Characteristics and User Interface

2020-10-12
WIP
J2802
This document specifies the minimum recommendations for Blind Spot Monitoring System (BSMS) operational characteristics and elements of the user interface. A visual BSMS indicator is recommended. BSMS detects and conveys to the driver via a visual indicator the presence of a target (e.g., a vehicle), adjacent to the subject vehicle in the “traditional” Adjacent Blind Spot Zone (ABSZ). The BSMS is not intended to replace the need for interior and exterior rear-view mirrors or to reduce mirror size. BSMS is only intended as a supplement to these mirrors and will not take any automatic vehicle control action to prevent possible collisions. While the BSMS will assist drivers in detecting the presence of vehicles in their ABSZ, the absence of a visual indicator will not guarantee that the driver can safely make a lane change maneuver (e.g., vehicles may be approaching rapidly outside the ABSZ area).
Standard

Lane Departure Warning Systems: Information for the Human Interface

2017-01-26
CURRENT
J2808_201701
The Lane Departure Warning (LDW) system is a crash-avoidance technology which warns drivers if they are drifting (or have drifted) out of their lane or from the roadway. This warning system is designed to reduce the possibility of a run-off-road crash. This system will not take control of the vehicle; it will only let the driver know that he/she needs to steer back into the lane. An LDW is not a lane-change monitor, which addresses intentional lane changes, or a blind spot monitoring system which warns of other vehicles in adjacent lanes. This informational report applies to OEM and after-market Lane Departure Warning systems for light-duty vehicles (gross vehicle weight rating of no more than 8500 pounds) on relatively straight roads with a radius of curvature of 500 m or more, and under good weather conditions.
Standard

Driver-Vehicle Interface Considerations for Lane Keeping Assistance Systems

2016-02-24
CURRENT
J3048_201602
The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for the implementation of driver-vehicle interfaces (DVI) for intervention-type lane keeping assistance systems (LKAS), as defined by ISO 11270. LKAS provide support for safe lane keeping operations by drivers via momentary intervention in lane keeping actions, but do not automate part or all of the dynamic driving task on a sustained basis (see SAE J3016). Thus they are not classified as a driving automation system per SAE J3016 - Taxonomy and Definitions for Terms Related to On-Road Motor Vehicle Automated Driving Systems, nor do they prevent possible lane or roadway departures, as drivers can always override an LKAS intervention and road conditions may be such that they cannot support an LKAS intervention (e.g., too slippery, curve to tight, lateral velocity too high, etc.).
Standard

Measurement of Minimum Noise Emitted by Road Vehicles

2015-11-10
CURRENT
J2889/1_201511
This SAE Standard is derived from SAE J2805 and specifies an engineering method for measuring the sound emitted by M and N category road vehicles at standstill and low speed operating conditions.. The specifications reproduce the level of sound which is generated by the principal vehicle sound sources consistent with stationary and low speed vehicle operating conditions relevant for pedestrian safety. The method is designed to meet the requirements of simplicity as far as they are consistent with reproducibility of results under the operating conditions of the vehicle. The test method requires an acoustic environment which is only obtained in an extensive open space or in special designed indoor facilities replicating the conditions of an extensive open space. Such conditions usually exist during: Measurements of vehicles for regulatory certification. Measurements at the manufacturing stage. Measurements at official testing stations.
Standard

Blind Spot Monitoring System (BSMS): Operating Characteristics and User Interface

2015-06-04
CURRENT
J2802_201506
This document specifies the minimum recommendations for Blind Spot Monitoring System (BSMS) operational characteristics and elements of the user interface. A visual BSMS indicator is recommended. BSMS detects and conveys to the driver via a visual indicator the presence of a target (e.g., a vehicle), adjacent to the subject vehicle in the “traditional” Adjacent Blind Spot Zone (ABSZ). The BSMS is not intended to replace the need for interior and exterior rear-view mirrors or to reduce mirror size. BSMS is only intended as a supplement to these mirrors and will not take any automatic vehicle control action to prevent possible collisions. While the BSMS will assist drivers in detecting the presence of vehicles in their ABSZ, the absence of a visual indicator will not guarantee that the driver can safely make a lane change maneuver (e.g., vehicles may be approaching rapidly outside the ABSZ area).
Standard

Human Factors in Forward Collision Warning Systems: Operating Characteristics and User Interface Requirements

2014-11-24
WIP
J2400
Forward Collision Warning (FCW) systems are onboard systems intended to provide alerts to assist drivers in avoiding striking the rear end of another moving or stationary motorized vehicle. This SAE Information Report describes elements for a FCW operator interface, as well as requirements and test methods for systems capable of warning drivers of rear-end collisions. This Information Report applies to original equipment and aftermarket FCW systems for passenger vehicles including cars, light trucks, and vans. This report does not apply to heavy trucks. Furthermore, this document does not address integration issues associated with adaptive cruise control (ACC), and consequently, aspects of the document could be inappropriate for an ACC system integrated with a FCW system.
Standard

Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) Operating Characteristics and User Interface

2014-09-25
CURRENT
J2399_201409
Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is an enhancement of conventional cruise control systems that allows the ACC-equipped vehicle to follow a forward vehicle at a pre-selected time gap, up to a driver selected speed, by controlling the engine, power train, and/or service brakes. This SAE Standard focuses on specifying the minimum requirements for ACC system operating characteristics and elements of the user interface. This document applies to original equipment and aftermarket ACC systems for passenger vehicles (including motorcycles). This document does not apply to heavy vehicles (GVWR > 10,000 lbs. or 4,536 kg). Furthermore, this document does not address other variations on ACC, such as “stop & go” ACC, that can bring the equipped vehicle to a stop and reaccelerate. Future revisions of this document should consider enhanced versions of ACC, as well as the integration of ACC with Forward Vehicle Collision Warning Systems (FVCWS).
Standard

Vehicle Sound Measurement at Low Speeds

2009-01-16
WIP
J2889
The Vehicle Sound for Pedestrians Subcommittee of the SAE Safety and Human Factors Committee is developing a test procedure to determine the sound output of electric and hybrid-electric powertrain vehicles at certain low-speed conditions. Establishing a consistent method of measuring the sound output of these vehicles will facilitate further study into the need for additional measures to alert pedestrians to the presence of these vehicles in traffic. This test procedure could also become industry practice should it later be deemed necessary to record the sound output of certain vehicles in low speed traffic conditions where vehicles, pedestrians and other road users are co-mingled.
Standard

Human Factors in Forward Collision Warning Systems: Operating Characteristics and User Interface Requirements

2003-08-29
CURRENT
J2400_200308
Forward Collision Warning (FCW) systems are onboard systems intended to provide alerts to assist drivers in avoiding striking the rear end of another moving or stationary motorized vehicle. This SAE Information Report describes elements for a FCW operator interface, as well as requirements and test methods for systems capable of warning drivers of rear-end collisions. This information report applies to original equipment and aftermarket FCW systems for passenger vehicles including cars, light trucks, and vans. This report does not apply to heavy trucks. Furthermore, this document does not address integration issues associated with adaptive cruise control (ACC), and consequently, aspects of the document could be inappropriate for an ACC system integrated with a FCW system.
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