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Standard

Aircraft Fuel Tank Inerting Systems

2017-04-05
WIP
ARP6078A
The Aerospace Recommended Practices of this document are intended for nitrogen-based Flammability Reduction Means (FRM) implemented on transport category, turbine powered airplanes. The recommended practices herein, therefore, relate only to the transport category aircraft, and focus specifically on contemporary inerting systems equipment. Such systems are referred to a Fuel Tank Inerting Systems (FTIS) in this document. This document does not cover the following: - Military aircraft applications - Air separation technologies other than hollow fiber membrane (HFM) and pressure swing adsorption (PSA) - Inerting of conventional unheated wing tanks or aircraft dry bays - Expected future technology solutions for the generation of inert gas. The advice contained in this document is aimed towards providing aircraft manufacturers with guidance on the key issues associated with contemporary aircraft fuel tank inerting systems to supplement the guidance in FAA Advisory Circular AC 25.981-2.
Standard

Reticulated Polyurethane Foam Explosion Suppression Material for Fuel Systems and Dry Bays

2016-08-19
CURRENT
AIR4170B
This document describes the initial development, evolution, and use of reticulated polyurethane foam as an explosion suppression material in fuel tanks and dry bays. It provides historical data, design practice guidelines, references, laboratory test data, and service data gained from past experience. The products discussed in this document may be referred to as "Safety Foam," "Reticulated Polyurethane Foam," "Baffle and Inerting Material," or "Electrostatic Suppression Material." These generic terms for the products discussed in this document are not meant to imply any safety warranty. Each individual design application should be thoroughly proof tested prior to production installation.
Standard

Contamination definition for Fuel Tank Inerting Systems

2016-02-01
WIP
AIR6374
The scope of this document is to provide a guidance of the common contamination types and their concentrations in order to size FTIS components and characterize its performance on generic commercial aircraft.
Standard

Fuel Tank Inerting System Ground and Flight Test Methodology Recommended Practice

2015-05-19
WIP
ARP6063
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidance for the verification and certification of a “commercial” fixed wing aircraft fuel tank inerting system (FTIS) and will provide technical references and data regarding ground and flight testing of an FTIS. The intent of this ARP is to address issues associated with the verification requirements based on current regulatory guidance per AC25.981-2C
Standard

Aircraft Inerting Systems

2014-05-07
WIP
AIR1903A
An airplane fuel tank inerting system provides an inert atmosphere in a fuel tank to minimize explosive ignition of fuel vapor. This AIR deals with the three methods of fuel tank inerting systems currently used in operational aircraft: (1) on-board inert gas generation systems (OBIGGS), (2) liquid/gaseous nitrogen systems and (3) Halon systems. The OBIGGS and nitrogen systems generally are designed to provide full-time fuel tank fire protection; the Halon systems generally are designed to provide only on-demand or combat-specific protection. This AIR does not treat the subject of Explosion Suppression Foam (ESF) that has been used for fuel tank explosion protection on a number of military aircraft. ESF is a totally passive, full-time protection system with multiple and simultaneous hit capability up to 23 mm. The primary disadvantages of foam are weight, reduction of usable fuel, and the added maintenance complexity when the foam must be removed for tank maintenance or inspection.
Standard

Aircraft Fuel Tank Inerting Systems

2012-10-03
CURRENT
ARP6078
The Aerospace Recommended Practices of this document are intended for nitrogen-based Flammability Reduction Means (FRM) implemented on transport category, turbine powered airplanes. The recommended practices herein, therefore, relate only to the transport category aircraft, and focus specifically on contemporary inerting systems equipment. Such systems are referred to a Fuel Tank Inerting Systems (FTIS) in this document. This document does not cover the following: Military aircraft applications Air separation technologies other than hollow fiber membrane (HFM) and pressure swing adsorption (PSA) Inerting of conventional unheated wing tanks or aircraft dry bays Expected future technology solutions for the generation of inert gas. The advice contained in this document is aimed towards providing aircraft manufacturers with guidance on the key issues associated with contemporary aircraft fuel tank inerting systems to supplement the guidance in FAA Advisory Circular AC 25.981-2.
Standard

Aircraft Inerting Systems

2008-07-10
CURRENT
AIR1903
An airplane fuel tank inerting system provides an inert atmosphere in a fuel tank to minimize explosive ignition of fuel vapor. This AIR deals with the three methods of fuel tank inerting systems currently used in operational aircraft: (1) on-board inert gas generation systems (OBIGGS), (2) liquid/gaseous nitrogen systems and (3) Halon systems. The OBIGGS and nitrogen systems generally are designed to provide full-time fuel tank fire protection; the Halon systems generally are designed to provide only on-demand or combat-specific protection. This AIR does not treat the subject of Explosion Suppression Foam (ESF) that has been used for fuel tank explosion protection on a number of military aircraft. ESF is a totally passive, full-time protection system with multiple and simultaneous hit capability up to 23 mm. The primary disadvantages of foam are weight, reduction of usable fuel, and the added maintenance complexity when the foam must be removed for tank maintenance or inspection.
Standard

Reticulated Polyurethane Foam Explosion Suppression Material for Fuel Systems and Dry Bays

1998-11-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4170A
This document describes the initial development, evolution, and use of reticulated polyurethane foam as an explosion suppression material in fuel tanks and dry bays. It provides historical data, design practice guidelines, references, laboratory test data, and service data gained from past experience. The products discussed in this document may be referred to as "Safety Foam," "Reticulated Polyurethane Foam," "Baffle and Inerting Material," "Electrostatic Suppression Material," or "SAFOAM." These generic terms for the products discussed in this document are not meant to imply any safety warranty. Each individual design application should be thoroughly proof tested prior to production installation.
Standard

RETICULATED POLYURETHANE FOAM EXPLOSION SUPPRESSION MATERIAL FOR FUEL SYSTEMS AND DRY BAYS

1991-12-02
HISTORICAL
AIR4170
This document describes the initial development, evolution, and use of reticulated polyurethane foam as an explosion suppression material in fuel tanks and dry bays. It provides historical data, design practice guidelines, references, laboratory test data, and service data gained from past experience. The products discussed in this document may be referred to as "Safety Foam," "Reticulated Polyurethane Foam," "Baffle and Inerting Material," "Electrostatic Suppression Material," or "SAFOAM." These generic terms for the products discussed in this document are not meant to imply any safety warranty. Each individual design application should be thoroughly proof tested prior to production installation.
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