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2010-11-03
Technical Paper
2010-22-0004
Priya Prasad, Harold J. Mertz, Dainius J. Dalmotas, Jeffrey S. Augenstein, Kennerly Digges
An evaluation of the four injury risk curves proposed in the NHTSA NCAP for estimating the risk of AIS≻=3 injuries to the head, neck, chest and AIS≻=2 injury to the Knee-Thigh-Hip (KTH) complex has been conducted. The predicted injury risk to the four body regions based on driver dummy responses in over 300 frontal NCAP tests were compared against those to drivers involved in real-world crashes of similar severity as represented in the NASS. The results of the study show that the predicted injury risks to the head and chest were slightly below those in NASS, and the predicted risk for the knee-thigh-hip complex was substantially below that observed in the NASS. The predicted risk for the neck by the Nij curve was greater than the observed risk in NASS by an order of magnitude due to the Nij risk curve predicting a non-zero risk when Nij = 0. An alternative and published Nte risk curve produced a risk estimate consistent with the NASS estimate of neck injury.
1997-11-12
Technical Paper
973296
Jeffrey S. Augenstein, Elana Perdeck, Jami Williamson, James Stratton, Kennerly Digges, Louis Lombardo
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Special Crash Investigations database contains twelve completed cases of child fatalities in rearward facing child seats caused by deploying air bags. Three of these are now available for examination. An additional two cases were investigated by the William Lehman Injury Research Center at the University of Miami School of Medicine. These five cases are examined to evaluate crash environment, injury mechanisms, and circumstances which caused the child to be in front of the passenger side air bag Four of the cases were crashes with impacts with the side of other cars with crash severities less than 15 mph. The predominate injury mechanism was brain and skull injury from a blow transmitted to the rear of the head through the child seat back. In one case, the force to the head was transmitted downward, directly from air bag contact.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970392
Jeffrey S. Augenstein, Elana Perdeck, Jami Williamson, James Stratton, Mary Murtha, Kathryn Sapnas, Kennerly Digges, A. C. Malliaris, Louis Lombardo
The William Lehman Injury Research Center has conducted multi-disciplinary investigations of one hundred seventy-eight crashes involving adult occupants protected by safety belts and air bags. In all cases, serious injuries were suspected. Nine cases involved serious heart injuries. These cases are not representative of crashes in general. However, when used in conjunction with National Accident Sampling System; Crashworthiness Data System (NASS/CDS) they provide insight into the most severe injuries suffered by restrained occupants in frontal crashes. Heart injuries are rare, but when they occur they are usually life threatening. NASS/CDS shows that heart injuries comprise about 0.2% of the injuries in frontal tow-away crashes. In the NHTSA file of Special Crash Investigations (SCI) of air bag cases, heart injuries are reported in 1% of the occupants over 15 years of age.
1996-02-01
Technical Paper
960660
Jeffrey S. Augenstein, Kennerly H. Digges, Elana B. Perdeck, Louis V. Lombardo, A. C. Malliaris
The William Lehman Injury Research Center has conducted multi-disciplinary investigations of fifty crashes involving drivers protected by air bags. In all cases, serious injuries were suspected. Nine cases involved fatal injuries. These cases are not representative of crashes in general. However, when used in conjunction with NASS/CDS they provide insight into the most severe injuries in crashes of vehicles equipped with air bags. A comparison with data from the National Accident Sampling System; Crashworthiness Data System (NASS/CDS) shows that head injury and abdominal injury make up a larger fraction in the Lehman data than in NASS/CDS. Examination of fatal cases indicates that head injuries are frequently caused by intruding structure or by unfavorable occupant kinematics among the unrestrained population.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950657
Jeffrey S. Augenstein, Kennerly H. Digges, Louis V. Lombardo, Elana B. Perdeck, James E. Stratton, Carla V. Quigley, A. C. Malliaris, Patricia M. Byers, Diego B. Nunez, Gregory A. Zych, Jonathan L. Andron, A. Kevin Craythorne, Perri E. Young
This paper is based on the crash and casualty experience compiled by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) National Accident Sampling System, Crashworthiness Data (NASS/CDS 1988-1992), and by the William Lehman Injury Research Center (University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital/Ryder Trauma Center) crash data files. The NASS/CDS files provide data on injuries to occupants in all types of tow-away crashes. The William Lehman Injury Research Center files provide detailed crash analysis and injury documentation of more than 100 restrained occupants with injuries from frontal crashes. These files provide a basis for recognizing injury patterns among restrained occupants and postulating their causes. The purpose of this paper is to report on an observed pattern of liver and spleen injuries suffered by drivers wearing shoulder belts without the lap belt fastened.
1994-03-01
Technical Paper
940714
Jeffrey S. Augenstein, Elana B. Perdeck, Kennerly H. Digges, Louis V. Lombardo, James E. Stratton, A. C. Malliaris, Patricia M. Byers, Diego B. Nunez, Gregory A. Zych, Jonathan L. Andron, A. Kevin Craythorne, Carla Verga
A multidisciplinary, automobile crash investigation team at the Jackson Memorial Hospital/Ryder Trauma Center in Miami, Florida, is conducting a detailed medical and engineering study. The focus is restrained (seatbelts and/or air bag) occupants involved in frontal crashes, who have also been severely injured. More than 60 crashes have been included in the study to date. Analysis of the initial data indicates that restraint systems are working to reduce many of the head and chest injuries which unrestrained occupants suffer. However, internal injuries among air bag-protected occupants may be unrecognized in the field providing new challenges in triage and injury diagnosis. In other cases, survival in extremely high severity crashes presents trauma management challenges due to the extent and complexity of the multiple injuries which result. The paper provides case examples to illustrate types of chest and abdominal injuries associated with air bag cases.
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