Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 4 of 4
2017-04-11
Journal Article
2017-01-9175
Yitao Zhu, Makarand Datar, Kalyan Addepalli, Natalie Remisoski
Nowadays, the vehicle design is highly ruled by the increasing customer demands and expectations. In addition to ride comfort and vehicle handling, the Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH) behavior of the powertrain is also a critical factor that has a big impact on the customer experience. To evaluate the powertrain NVH characteristics, the NVH error states should be studied. A typical NVH event could be decoupled into 3 parts: source, path, and receiver. Take-off shudder, which evaluates the NVH severity level during vehicle take-off, is one of the most important NVH error states. The main sources of Front Wheel Drive (FWD) take-off shudder are the plunging Constant Velocity Joints (CVJ) on the left and right half shafts. This is because a plunging CVJ generates a third order plunging force with half shaft Revolution Per Minute (RPM), which is along the slip of the plunging CVJ.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1054
Imad M. Khan, Makrand Datar, Wulong Sun, Georg Festag, T Bin Juang, Natalie Remisoski
Abstract At various milestones during a vehicle’s development program, different CAE models are created to assess NVH error states of concern. Moreover, these CAE models may be developed in different commercial CAE software packages, each one with its own unique advantages and strengths. Fortunately, due to the wide spread acceptance that the Functional Mock-up Interface (FMI) standard gained in the CAE community over the past few years, many commercial CAE software now support cosimulation in one form or the other. Cosimulation allows performing multi-domain/multi-resolution simulations of the vehicle, thereby combining the advantages of various modeling techniques and software. In this paper, we explore cosimulation of full 3D vehicle model developed in MSC ADAMS with 1D driveline model developed in LMS AMESim. The target application of this work is investigation of vehicle NVH error states associated with both hybridized and non-hybridized powertrains.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1136
Jack S.P. Liu, Natalie Remisoski, Javed Iqbal, Robert Egenolf
Automotive vehicles equipped with Cardan joints may experience low frequency vehicle launch shudder vibration (5-30Hz) and high frequency driveline moan vibration (80-200Hz) under working angles and speeds. The Cardan joint introduces a 2nd order driveshaft speed variation and a 4th order joint articulation torque (JAT) causing the vehicle shudder and moan NVH issues. Research on the Cardan joint induced low frequency vehicle shudder using a Multi-Body System (MBS) method has been attempted. A comprehensive MBS method to predict Cardan joint induced high frequency driveline moan vibration is yet to be developed. This paper presents a hybrid MBS and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) approach to predict Cardan joint induced high frequency driveshaft moan vibration. The CAE method considers the elastically coupled driveshaft bending and engine block vibration due to Cardan joint excitation.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2228
Kalyan Chakravarthy Addepalli, Natalie Remisoski, Anthony Sleath, Shyiping Liu
Abstract Drivelines used in modern pickup trucks commonly employ universal joints. This type of joint is responsible for second driveshaft order vibrations in the vehicle. Large displacements of the joint connecting the driveline and the rear axle have a detrimental effect on vehicle NVH. As leaf springs are critical energy absorbing elements that connect to the powertrain, they are used to restrain large axle windup angles. One of the most common types of leaf springs in use today is the multi-stage parabolic leaf spring. A simple SAE 3-link approximation is adequate for preliminary studies but it has been found to be inadequate to study axle windup. A vast body of literature exists on modeling leaf springs using nonlinear FEA and multibody simulations. However, these methods require significant amount of component level detail and measured data. As such, these techniques are not applicable for quick sensitivity studies at design conception stage.
Viewing 1 to 4 of 4