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Viewing 1 to 4 of 4
2017-09-25
Book
Ravi Rajamani
The environmental impact of hydrocarbon-burning aircraft is one of the main motivations for the move to electric propulsion in aerospace. Also, cars, buses, and trucks are incorporating electric or hybrid-electric propulsion systems, reducing the pressure on hydrocarbons and lowering the costs of electrical components. The economies of scale necessitated by the automotive industry will help contain costs in the aviation sector as well. The use of electric propulsion in airplanes is not a new phenomenon. However, it is only recently that it has taken off in a concrete manner with a viable commercial future. The Electric Flight Technology: Unfolding of a New Future reviews the history of this field, discusses the key underlying technologies, and describes how the future for these technologies will likely unfold, distinguishing between all-electric (AE) and hybrid-electric (HE) architectures. Written by Dr.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2584
Andrew Dickerson, Ravi Rajamani, Mike Boost, John Jackson
Abstract A high fidelity system for estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) for Li-ion batteries for aerospace applications is presented. The system employs particle filtering coupled with outlier detection to predict RUL. Calculations of RUL are based on autonomous measurements of the battery state-of-health by onboard electronics. Predictions for RUL are fed into a maintenance advisor which allows operators to more effectively plan battery removal. The RUL algorithm has been exercised under stressful conditions to assert robustness.
2013-09-17
Technical Paper
2013-01-2333
Ravi Rajamani, Abhinav Saxena, Frank Kramer, Michael Augustin, J.B. Schroeder, Kai Goebel, Ginger Shao, Indranil Roychoudhury, Wei Lin
The term Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) describes a set of capabilities that enable sustainable and safe operation of components and subsystems within aerospace platforms. However, very little guidance exists for the systems engineering aspects of design with IVHM in mind. It is probably because of this that designers have to use knowledge picked up exclusively by experience rather than by established process. This motivated a group of leading IVHM practitioners within the aerospace industry under the aegis of SAE's HM-1 technical committee to author a document that hopes to give working engineers and program managers clear guidance on all the elements of IVHM that they need to consider before designing a system. This proposed recommended practice (ARP6883 [1]) will describe all the steps of requirements generation and management as it applies to IVHM systems, and demonstrate these with a “real-world” example related to designing a landing gear system.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2704
Ravi Rajamani, Nicholas Waters
The use of Engine Health Management (EHM) systems has been growing steadily in both the civilian and the military aerospace sectors. Barring a few notable exceptions (such as certain temperature and thrust margin monitoring) regulatory authorities around the world have not required these systems to be certified in any way. This is changing rapidly. New airframes and engines are increasingly being designed with the assumption that EHM will be an integral part of the way customers will operate these assets. This leads to a need for better guidelines on how such systems should be certified. The SAE E-32 committee on Propulsion System Health Monitoring is leading an industry-wide effort to develop a set of guidelines for certifying EHM systems.
Viewing 1 to 4 of 4