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2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2168
Vahid Hosseini, W Neill, Hongsheng Guo, Cosmin Emil Dumitrescu, Wallace Chippior, Craig Fairbridge, Ken Mitchell
The effects of cetane number, aromatics content and 90% distillation temperature (T90) on HCCI combustion were investigated using a fuel matrix designed by the Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) Working Group of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC). The experiments were conducted in a single-cylinder, variable compression ratio, Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine. The fuels were atomized and partially vaporized in the intake manifold. The engine was operated at a relative air/fuel ratio of 1.2, 60% exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and 900 rpm. The compression ratio was varied over the range of 9:1 to 15:1 to optimize the combustion phasing for each fuel, keeping other operating parameters constant. The results show that cetane number and T90 distillation temperature significantly affected the combustion phasing. Cetane number was clearly found to have the strongest effect.
2009-11-02
Journal Article
2009-01-2769
Thomas Gallant, James A. Franz, Mikhail S. Alnajjar, John M.E. Storey, Samuel A. Lewis, C. Scott Sluder, William J. Cannella, Craig Fairbridge, Darcy Hager, Heather Dettman, Jon Luecke, Matthew A. Ratcliff, Bradley T. Zigler
The CRC Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines working group has worked to identify a matrix of research diesel fuels for use in advanced combustion research applications. Nine fuels were specified and formulated to investigate the effects of cetane number aromatic content and 90% distillation fraction. Standard ASTM analyses were performed on the fuels as well as GC/MS and1H/13C NMR analyses and thermodynamic characterizations. Details of the actual results of the fuel formulations compared with the design values are presented, as well as results from standard analyses, such as heating value, viscosity and density. Cetane number characterizations were accomplished by using both the engine method and the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT™) apparatus.
2009-11-02
Technical Paper
2009-01-2646
Scott J. Eaton, Bruce G. Bunting, Samuel A. Lewis, Craig Fairbridge
In this investigation, oil shale crude obtained from the Green River Formation in Colorado using Paraho Direct retorting was mildly hydrotreated and distilled to produce 7 narrow boiling point fuels of equal volumes. The resulting derived cetane numbers ranged between 38.3 and 43.9. Fuel chemistry and bulk properties strongly correlated with boiling point. The fuels were run in a simple HCCI engine to evaluate combustion performance. Each cut exhibited elevated NOx emissions, from 150 to 300ppm higher than conventional ULSD under similar conditions. Engine performance and operating range were additionally dictated by distillation temperatures which are a useful predictor variable for this fuel set. In general, cuts with low boiling point achieved optimal HCCI combustion phasing while higher boiling point cuts suffered a 25% fuel economy decrease, compared to conventional diesel under similar HCCI conditions, and incurred heavy engine deposits.
2008-10-06
Technical Paper
2008-01-2406
Bruce G. Bunting, Scott J. Eaton, John Storey, Craig Fairbridge, Ken Mitchell, Robert W. Crawford, Tom Gallant, Jim Franz, Mikhail Alnaijar
Diesel fuels derived from different types of crude oil can exhibit different chemistry while still meeting market requirements and specifications. Oil sands derived fuels typically contain a larger proportion of cycloparaffinic compounds, which result from the cracking and hydrotreating of bitumens in the crude. In the current study, 17 refinery streams consisting of finished fuels and process streams were obtained from a refinery using 100% oil sands derived crude oil. All samples except one met the ULSD standard of 15 ppm sulfur. The samples were characterized for properties and chemistry and run in a simple premixed HCCI engine using intake heating for combustion phasing control. Results indicate that the streams could be equally well characterized by chemistry or properties, and some simple correlations are presented. Cetane number was found to relate mainly to mono-aromatic content and the cycloparaffins did not appear to possess any unique diesel related chemical effects.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-3144
W. Stuart Neill, Wallace L. Chippior, Jean Cooley, Mike Doma, Craig Fairbridge, Robert Falkiner, Robert L. McCormick, Ken Mitchell
The exhaust emissions from a single-cylinder version of a heavy-duty diesel engine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) were studied using 12 diesel fuels derived from oil sands and conventional sources. The test fuels were blended from 22 refinery streams to produce four fuels (two from each source) at three different total aromatic levels (10, 20, and 30% by mass). The cetane numbers were held constant at 43. Exhaust emissions were measured using the AVL eight-mode steady-state test procedure. PM emissions were accurately modeled by a single regression equation with two predictors, total aromatics and sulphur content. Sulphate emissions were found to be independent of the type of sulphur compound in the fuel. NOx emissions were accurately modeled by a single regression equation with total aromatics and density as predictor variables. PM and NOx emissions were significantly significantly affected by fuel properties, but crude oil source did not play a role.
2000-06-19
Technical Paper
2000-01-1856
W. Stuart Neill, Wallace L. Chippior, Ömer L. Gülder, Jean Cooley, E. Keith Richardson, Ken Mitchell, Craig Fairbridge
The influence of fuel aromatics type on the particulate matter (PM) and NOx exhaust emissions of a heavy-duty, single-cylinder, DI diesel engine was investigated. Eight fuels were blended from conventional and oil sands crude oil sources to form five fuel pairs with similar densities but with different poly-aromatic (1.6 to 14.6%) or total aromatic (14.3 to 39.0%) levels. The engine was tuned to meet the U.S. EPA 1994 emission standards. An eight-mode, steady-state simulation of the U.S. EPA heavy-duty transient test procedure was followed. The experimental results show that there were no statistically significant differences in the PM and NOx emissions of the five fuel pairs after removing the fuel sulphur content effect on PM emissions. However, there was a definite trend towards higher NOx emissions as the fuel density, poly-aromatic and total aromatic levels of the test fuels increased.
Viewing 1 to 6 of 6