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Viewing 1 to 20 of 20
2017-08-11
Journal Article
2017-01-9379
John Thomas, Shean Huff, Brian West, Paul Chambon
Abstract Aggressive driving is an important topic for many reasons, one of which is higher energy used per unit distance traveled, potentially accompanied by an elevated production of greenhouse gases and other pollutants. Examining a large data set of self-reported fuel economy (FE) values revealed that the dispersion of FE values is quite large and is larger for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) than for conventional gasoline vehicles. This occurred despite the fact that the city and highway FE ratings for HEVs are generally much closer in value than for conventional gasoline vehicles. A study was undertaken to better understand this and better quantify the effects of aggressive driving, including reviewing past aggressive driving studies, developing and exercising a new vehicle energy model, and conducting a related experimental investigation.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0837
Reed Hanson, Shawn Spannbauer, Christopher Gross, Rolf D. Reitz, Scott Curran, John Storey, Shean Huff
Abstract In the current work, a series-hybrid vehicle has been constructed that utilizes a dual-fuel, Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) engine. The vehicle is a 2009 Saturn Vue chassis and a 1.9L turbo-diesel engine converted to operate with low temperature RCCI combustion. The engine is coupled to a 90 kW AC motor, acting as an electrical generator to charge a 14.1 kW-hr lithium-ion traction battery pack, which powers the rear wheels by a 75 kW drive motor. Full vehicle testing was conducted on chassis dynamometers at the Vehicle Emissions Research Laboratory at Ford Motor Company and at the Vehicle Research Laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For this work, the US Environmental Protection Agency Highway Fuel Economy Test was performed using commercially available gasoline and ultra-low sulfur diesel.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1614
John Thomas, Shean Huff, Brian West
To quantify the fuel economy (FE) effect of some common vehicle accessories or alterations, a compact passenger sedan and a sport utility vehicle (SUV) were subjected to SAE J2263 coastdown procedures. Coastdowns were conducted with low tire pressure, all windows open, with a roof top or hitch-mounted cargo carrier, and with the SUV pulling an enclosed cargo trailer. From these coastdowns, vehicle dynamometer coefficients were developed which enabled the execution of vehicle dynamometer experiments to determine the effect of these changes on vehicle FE and emissions over standard drive cycles and at steady highway speeds. In addition, two minivans were subjected to coastdowns to examine the similarity in derived coefficients for two duplicate vehicles of the same model. The FE penalty associated with the rooftop cargo box mounted on the compact sedan was as high as 25-27% at higher speeds, where the aerodynamic drag is most pronounced.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0311
John Thomas, Brian West, Shean Huff
Proper maintenance can help vehicles perform as designed, positively affecting fuel economy, emissions, and overall driveability. This paper addresses the issue of whether air filter replacement improves fuel economy. Described are measured results for increasing air filter pressure drop in turbocharged diesel-engine-powered vehicles, with primary focus on changes in vehicle fuel economy but also including emissions and performance. Older studies of carbureted gasoline vehicles have indicated that replacing a clogged or dirty air filter can improve vehicle fuel economy and, conversely, that a dirty air filter can be significantly detrimental to fuel economy. In contrast, a recent study showed that the fuel economy of modern gasoline vehicles is virtually unaffected by filter clogging due to the closed loop control and throttled operation of these engines. Because modern diesel engines operate without throttling (or with minimal throttling), a different result could be anticipated.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1113
John Thomas, Ho-Ling Hwang, Brian West, Shean Huff
The fueleconomy.gov website provides information such as “window label” fuel economy for city, highway, and combined driving for all U.S.-legal light-duty vehicles from 1984 to present. The site is jointly maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and also offers a considerable amount of consumer information and advice pertaining to vehicle fuel economy and energy-related issues. Included with advice pertaining to driving styles and habits is information concerning the trend that as highway cruising speed is increased, fuel economy will degrade. An effort was undertaken to quantify this “conventional wisdom” through analysis of dynamometer testing results for 74 vehicles at steady-state speeds from 50 to 80 mph. Using this experimental data, several simple models were developed to predict individual vehicle fuel economy and its rate of change over the 50-80 mph speed range interval.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0551
Shean Huff, Brian West, John Thomas
On-road and laboratory experiments with a 2009 Ford Explorer and a 2009 Toyota Corolla were conducted to assess the fuel consumption penalty associated with air conditioner (A/C) use at idle and highway cruise conditions. Vehicle data were acquired on-road and on a chassis dynamometer. Data were gathered for various A/C settings and with the A/C off and the windows open. At steady speeds between 64.4 and 113 kph (40 and 70 mph), both vehicles consumed more fuel with the A/C on at maximum cooling load (compressor at 100% duty cycle) than when driving with the windows down. The Explorer maintained this trend beyond 113 kph (70 mph), while the Corolla fuel consumption with the windows down matched that of running the A/C at 121 kph (75 mph), and exceeded it at 129 kph (80 mph). The incremental fuel consumption rate penalty due to air conditioner use was nearly constant with a slight trend of increasing consumption with increasing vehicle (and compressor) speed.
2012-09-10
Technical Paper
2012-01-1717
John Thomas, Brian West, Shean Huff, Kevin Norman
Proper maintenance can help vehicles perform as designed, positively affecting fuel economy, emissions, and the overall drivability. This effort investigates the effect of one maintenance factor, intake air filter replacement, with primary focus on vehicle fuel economy, but also examining emissions and performance. Older studies, dealing with carbureted gasoline vehicles, have indicated that replacing a clogged or dirty air filter can improve vehicle fuel economy and conversely that a dirty air filter can be significantly detrimental to fuel economy. The effect of clogged air filters on the fuel economy, acceleration and emissions of five gasoline fueled vehicles is examined. Four of these were modern vehicles, featuring closed-loop control and ranging in model year from 2003 to 2007. Three vehicles were powered by naturally aspirated, port fuel injection (PFI) engines of differing size and cylinder configuration: an inline 4, a V6 and a V8.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0437
John M. E. Storey, Teresa L. Barone, John F. Thomas, Shean P. Huff
Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines can offer better fuel economy and higher performance over their port-fuel-injected (PFI) counterparts, and are now appearing in increasingly more U.S. and European vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged GDI engines are replacing large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, in order for manufacturers to meet the U.S. fuel economy standards for 2016. Furthermore, lean-burn GDI engines can offer even higher fuel economy than stoichiometric GDI engines and have overcome challenges associated with cost-effective aftertreatment for NOx control. Along with changes in gasoline engine technology, fuel composition may increase in ethanol content beyond the current 10% due to the recent EPA waiver allowing 15% ethanol. In addition, the Renewable Fuels Standard passed as part of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) mandates the use of biofuels in upcoming years.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1218
Paul Chambon, Shean Huff, Kevin Norman, K. Dean Edwards, John Thomas, Vitaly Prikhodko
Lean Gasoline Direct Injection (LGDI) combustion is a promising technical path for achieving significant improvements in fuel efficiency while meeting future emissions requirements. Though Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct Injection (SGDI) technology is commercially available in a few vehicles on the American market, LGDI vehicles are not, but can be found in Europe. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) obtained a European BMW 1-series fitted with a 2.01 LGDI engine. The vehicle was instrumented and commissioned on a chassis dynamometer. The engine and after-treatment performance and emissions were characterized over US drive cycles (Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET), and US06 Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06)) and steady state mappings. The vehicle micro hybrid features (engine stop-start and intelligent alternator) were benchmarked as well during the course of that study.
2010-10-25
Journal Article
2010-01-2267
James E. Parks, Vitaly Prikhodko, William Partridge, Jae-Soon Choi, Kevin Norman, Shean Huff, Paul Chambon
Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts can effectively reduce NOx from lean engine exhaust. Significant research for LNTs in diesel engine applications has been performed and has led to commercialization of the technology. For lean gasoline engine applications, advanced direct injection engines have led to a renewed interest in the potential for lean gasoline vehicles and, thereby, a renewed demand for lean NOx control. To understand the gasoline-based reductant chemistry during regeneration, a BMW lean gasoline vehicle has been studied on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samples were collected and analyzed for key reductant species such as H₂, CO, NH₃, and hydrocarbons during transient drive cycles. The relation of the reductant species to LNT performance will be discussed. Furthermore, the challenges of NOx storage in the lean gasoline application are reviewed.
2009-11-02
Technical Paper
2009-01-2723
Keith Knoll, Brian West, Shean Huff, John Thomas, John Orban, Cynthia Cooper
Tests were conducted during 2008 on 16 late-model, conventional vehicles (1999 through 2007) to determine short-term effects of mid-level ethanol blends on performance and emissions. Vehicle odometer readings ranged from 10,000 to 100,000 miles, and all vehicles conformed to federal emissions requirements for their federal certification level. The LA92 drive cycle, also known as the Unified Cycle, was used for testing as it was considered to more accurately represent real-world acceleration rates and speeds than the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) used for emissions certification testing. Test fuels were splash-blends of up to 20 volume percent ethanol with federal certification gasoline. Both regulated and unregulated air-toxic emissions were measured. For the aggregate 16-vehicle fleet, increasing ethanol content resulted in reductions in average composite emissions of both NMHC and CO and increases in average emissions of ethanol and aldehydes.
2008-10-06
Technical Paper
2008-01-2493
Jim Parks, Vitaly Prikhodko, Mike Kass, Shean Huff
It is widely recognized that future NOx and particulate matter (PM) emission targets for diesel engines cannot be met solely via advanced combustion over the full engine drive cycle. Therefore some combination of advanced combustion and aftertreatment technologies will be required. In this study, advanced combustion modes operating with a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a lean NOx trap (LNT) catalyst were evaluated on a 1.7 liter 4-cylinder diesel engine. The combustion approaches included baseline engine operation with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and one PCCI-type (premixed charge combustion ignition) combustion mode to enable high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). Five steady-state operating conditions were evaluated. At the low load setting the exhaust temperature was too low to enable LNT regeneration and oxidation; however, HECC (low NOx) was achievable.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0448
Jim Parks, Brian West, Matt Swartz, Shean Huff
Lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts with different formulations have been characterized on a light-duty diesel engine platform. Two in-cylinder regeneration strategies were used during the study. The reductant chemistry differed for both strategies with one strategy having high levels of CO and H2 and the other strategy having a higher hydrocarbon component. The matrix of LNT catalysts that were characterized included LNTs with various sorbate loads and varying ceria content; the sorbate was Ba. Intra-catalyst measurements of exhaust gas composition were obtained at one quarter, one half, and three quarters of the length of the catalysts to better understand the affect of formulation on performance. Exhaust analysis with FTIR allowed measurement of NH3 and thereby, a measurement of N2 selectivity for the catalysts. Although overall NOx conversion increased with increasing sorbate load, the formation of NH3 increased as well.
2007-10-29
Technical Paper
2007-01-3997
Jim Parks, Shean Huff, Mike Kass, John Storey
One challenge in meeting emission regulations with catalytic aftertreatment systems is maintaining the proper catalyst temperatures that enable the catalytic devices to perform the emissions reduction. In this study, in-cylinder techniques are used to actively control the temperature of a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF) in order to raise the DPF temperature to induce particulate oxidation. The performance of four strategies is compared for two different starting DPF temperatures (150°C and 300°C) on a 4-cylinder 1.7-liter diesel engine. The four strategies include: (1) addition of extra fuel injection early in the combustion cycle for all four cylinders, (2) addition of extra fuel injection late in the combustion cycle for all four cylinders, (3) operating one-cylinder with extra fuel injection early in the combustion cycle, and (4) operating one-cylinder with extra fuel injection late in the combustion cycle.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3423
Matt Swartz, Shean Huff, James Parks, Brian West
Due to increasingly stringent emissions regulations, Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts are being researched as a potential solution for diesel engine emissions reduction. LNTs are practical for diesel NOx reduction due to their ability to reduce NOx from the O2 rich environment produced by diesel engines. LNTs function by storing NOx on the catalyst surface during efficient lean operation then, under rich conditions, releasing and reducing the trapped NOx. One method of producing this rich environment which regenerates a LNT involves manipulating the fuel injection parameters and throttling the air intake. This process is called in-cylinder regeneration. Experiments will be described here in which a 1.7 L common rail diesel engine has been used to regenerate LNTs at various stages of sulfur exposure, a known poison of the LNT.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0212
Brian West, Shean Huff, James Parks, Matt Swartz, Ron Graves
Hydrogen (H2) is an excellent reductant, and has been shown to be highly effective when introduced into a variety of catalysts such as three-way catalysts, lean NOx traps (LNTs), and hydrocarbon lean NOx catalysts (also termed hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts). Furthermore, since lean-burn engines offer improved fuel efficiency yet difficult NOx emission control, H2 production during lean operation for the purpose of NOx reduction could be beneficial. On-board generation of hydrogen is being explored via catalytic or plasma-based reformers. A possible alternative to these add-on systems is generation of the H2 in-cylinder with standard fuel injection hardware. This paper details experiments relating to the production and measurement of H2 under net-lean operation in a common-rail diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel control is used to tailor the combustion process such that H2 is generated while maintaining a lean Air:Fuel ratio in the bulk exhaust gas.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1416
Shean Huff, Brian West, Jim Parks, Matt Swartz, Johney Green, Ron Graves
A Lean NOx Trap (LNT) regeneration method that has shown promise regarding its ability to effectively regenerate the LNT, while not adversely affecting the PM emissions, involves the use of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC). LTC is accomplished by highly diluting the intake charge with EGR.1-3* If enough EGR is applied, the in-cylinder air:fuel mixture, and ensuing exhaust, will become rich, thereby regenerating the LNT. This type of highly dilute combustion tends to be more premixed than diffusion, which can lower engine-out PM and NOx emissions. LTC regeneration has been characterized and results are presented comparing this approach to other approaches for rich, in-cylinder diesel combustion for LNT regeneration.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3876
Jim Parks, Shean Huff, Josh Pihl, Jae-Soon Choi, Brian West
NOx emissions have traditionally been difficult to control from diesel engines; however, lean NOx trap catalysts have been shown to reduce NOx emissions from diesel engines by greater than 90% under some conditions. It is imperative that lean NOx traps be highly selective to N2 to achieve the designed NOx emissions reduction. If selectivity for NOx reduction to NH3 or N2O is significant then, ultimately, higher levels of pollution or greenhouse emissions will result. Here studies of the N2 selectivity of lean NOx trap regeneration with in-cylinder techniques are presented. Engine dynamometer studies with a light-duty engine were performed, and a lean NOx trap in the exhaust system was regenerated by controlling in-cylinder fuel injection timing and amounts to achieve rich exhaust conditions. NH3 and N2O emissions were analyzed with FTIR spectroscopy.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0186
Peter O. Witze, Shean P. Huff, John M. Storey, Brian H. West
Laser-induced incandescence is used to measure time-resolved diesel particulate emissions for two lean NOx trap regeneration strategies that utilize intake throttling and in-cylinder fuel enrichment. The results show that when the main injection event is increased in duration and delayed 13 crank-angle degrees, particulate emissions are very high. For a repetitive pattern of 3 seconds of rich regeneration followed by 27 seconds of NOx-trap loading, we find a monotonic increase in particulate emissions during the loading intervals that approaches twice the initial baseline particulate level after 1000 seconds. In contrast, particulate emissions during the regeneration intervals are constant throughout the test sequence.
2004-10-25
Technical Paper
2004-01-3023
Brian West, Shean Huff, James Parks, Sam Lewis, Jae-Soon Choi, William Partridge, John Storey
Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts are capable of reducing NOx in lean exhaust from diesel engines. NOx is stored on the catalyst during lean operation; then, under rich exhaust conditions, the NOx is released from and reduced by the catalyst. The process of NOx release and reduction is called regeneration. One method of obtaining the rich conditions for regeneration is to inject additional fuel into the engine cylinders while throttling the engine intake air flow to effectively run the engine at rich air:fuel ratios; this method is called “in-cylinder” regeneration. In-cylinder regeneration of LNT catalysts has been demonstrated and is a candidate emission control technique for commercialization of light-duty diesel vehicles to meet future emission regulations. In the study presented here, a 1.7-liter diesel engine with a LNT catalyst system was used to evaluate in-cylinder regeneration techniques.
Viewing 1 to 20 of 20

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