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Viewing 1 to 12 of 12
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1106
Sylvain Pagerit, Thierry Roudier, Phillip Sharer, Aymeric Rousseau
Abstract Many of today's advanced simulation tools are suitable for modeling specific systems, but they provide rather limited support for automated model building and management. The diverse tools available for modeling different components of a vehicle make it all the more challenging to comprehend their integration and interactions and analyze the complete system. In addition, the complexities and sizes of the models require a better use of computing resources, such as multicore or remote processing, to greatly reduce the simulation time. In this paper we describe how modern software techniques can support modeling and design activities, with the objective to create system models quickly by assembling them in a “plug-and-play” architecture. System models can be integrated, co-simulated, and reused regardless of the environment in which they are developed, and their simulation results can be consolidated for analysis into a single tool.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2325
Lawrence Michaels, Sylvain Pagerit, Aymeric Rousseau, Phillip Sharer, Shane Halbach, Ram Vijayagopal, Michael Kropinski, Gregory Matthews, Minghui Kao, Onassis Matthews, Michael Steele, Anthony Will
Model-based control system design improves quality, shortens development time, lowers engineering cost, and reduces rework. Evaluating a control system's performance, functionality, and robustness in a simulation environment avoids the time and expense of developing hardware and software for each design iteration. Simulating the performance of a design can be straightforward (though sometimes tedious, depending on the complexity of the system being developed) with mathematical models for the hardware components of the system (plant models) and control algorithms for embedded controllers. This paper describes a software tool and a methodology that not only allows a complete system simulation to be performed early in the product design cycle, but also greatly facilitates the construction of the model by automatically connecting the components and subsystems that comprise it.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0241
Shane Halbach, Phillip Sharer, Sylvain Pagerit, Aymeric P. Rousseau, Charles Folkerts
Many of today's automotive control system simulation tools are suitable for simulation, but they provide rather limited support for model building and management. Setting up a simulation model requires more than writing down state equations and running them on a computer. The role of a model library is to manage the models of physical components of the system and allow users to share and easily reuse them. In this paper, we describe how modern software techniques can be used to support modeling and design activities; the objective is to provide better system models in less time by assembling these system models in a “plug-and-play” architecture. With the introduction of hybrid electric vehicles, the number of components that can populate a model has increased considerably, and more components translate into more possible drivetrain configurations. To address these needs, we explain how users can simulate a large number of drivetrain configurations.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-1334
Dominik Karbowski, Sylvain Pagerit, Jason Kwon, Aymeric Rousseau, Karl-Felix Freiherr von Pechmann
Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) use electric energy from the grid rather than fuel energy for most short trips, therefore drastically reducing fuel consumption. Different configurations can be used for PHEVs. In this study, the parallel pre-transmission, series, and power-split configurations were compared by using global optimization. The latter allows a fair comparison among different powertrains. Each vehicle was operated optimally to ensure that the results would not be biased by non-optimally tuned or designed controllers. All vehicles were sized to have a similar all-electric range (AER), performance, and towing capacity. Several driving cycles and distances were used. The advantages of each powertrain are discussed.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-1008
Antoine Delorme, Aymeric Rousseau, Phil Sharer, Sylvain Pagerit, Thomas Wallner
Fuel cell vehicles are undergoing extensive research and development because of their potential for high efficiency and low emissions. Because fuel cell vehicles remain expensive and there is limited demand for hydrogen at present, very few fueling stations are being built. To try to accelerate the development of a hydrogen economy, some original equipment manufacturers in the automotive industry have been working on a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine (ICE) as an intermediate step. This paper compares the fuel economy potential of hydrogen powertrains to conventional gasoline vehicles. Several timeframes are considered: 2010, 2015, 2030, and 2045. To address the technology status uncertainty, a triangular distribution approach was implemented for each component technology. The fuel consumption and cost of five powertrain configurations will be discussed and compared with the conventional counterpart.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-1383
Mohammed Fellah, Gurhari Singh, Aymeric Rousseau, Sylvain Pagerit, Edward Nam, George Hoffman
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have the ability to significantly reduce petroleum consumption. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), working with the FreedomCAR and Fuels Partnership, helped define the battery requirements for PHEVs. Previous studies demonstrated the impact of the vehicle's characteristics, such as its class, mass, or electrical accessories, on the requirements. However, questions on the impact of drive cycles remain outstanding. In this paper, we evaluate the consequences of sizing the electrical machine and the battery to follow standard drive cycles, such as the urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS), as well as real-world drive cycles in electric vehicle (EV) mode. The requirements are defined for several driving conditions (e.g., urban, highway) and types of driving behavior (e.g., smooth, aggressive).
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0460
Phillip B. Sharer, Aymeric Rousseau, Dominik Karbowski, Sylvain Pagerit
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has invested considerable research and development (R&D) effort into Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) technology because of the potential fuel displacement offered by the technology. DOE's PHEV R&D Plan [1], which is driven by the desire to reduce dependence on foreign oil by diversifying the fuel sources of automobiles, describes the various activities required to achieve the goals. The U.S. DOE will use Argonne's Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to guide its analysis activities, stating, “Argonne's Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) will be used to design and evaluate a series of PHEVs with various ‘primary electric’ ranges, considering all-electric and charge-depleting strategies.” PSAT was used to simulate three possible charge-depleting (CD) PHEV control strategies for a power split hybrid. Trip distance was factored into the CD strategies before the cycle was started.
2007-10-30
Technical Paper
2007-01-4250
Andrew Dyer, Sylvain Pagerit, Makarand Datar, Daniel Mehr, Dan Negrut
The use of virtual prototyping early in the design stage of a product has gained popularity due to reduced cost and time to market. The state of the art in vehicle simulation has reached a level where full vehicles are analyzed through simulation but major difficulties continue to be present in interfacing the vehicle model with accurate powertrain models and in developing adequate formulations for the contact between tire and terrain (specifically, scenarios such as tire sliding on ice and rolling on sand or other very deformable surfaces). The proposed work focuses on developing a ground vehicle simulation capability by combining several third party packages for vehicle simulation, tire simulation, and powertrain simulation. The long-term goal of this project consists in promoting the Digital Car idea through the development of a reliable and robust simulation capability that will enhance the understanding and control of off-road vehicle performance.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0295
Phillip Sharer, Aymeric Rousseau, Sylvain Pagerit, Paul Nelson
Because Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) substitute electrical power from the utility grid for fuel, they have the potential to reduce petroleum use significantly. However, adoption of PHEVs has been hindered by expensive, low-energy batteries. Recent improvements in Li-ion batteries and hybrid control have addressed battery-related issues and have brought PHEVs within reach. The FreedomCAR Office of Vehicle Technology has a program that studies the potential benefit of PHEVs. This program also attempts to clarify and refine the requirements for PHEV components. Because the battery appears to be the main technical barrier, both from a performance and cost perspective, the main efforts have been focused on that component. Working with FreedomCAR energy storage and vehicle experts, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) researchers have developed a process to define the requirements of energy storage systems for plug-in applications.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0667
A. Rousseau, J. Kwon, P. Sharer, S. Pagerit, M. Duoba
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), working with the FreedomCAR Partnership, maintains the hybrid vehicle simulation software, Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT). The importance of component models and the complexity involved in setting up optimized control laws require validation of the models and control strategies. Using its Advanced Powertrain Research Facilities (APRF), ANL thoroughly tested the 2004 Toyota Prius to validate the PSAT drivetrain. In this paper, we will first describe the methodology used to quality check test data. Then, we will explain the validation process leading to the simulated vehicle control strategy tuning, which is based on the analysis of the differences between test and simulation. Finally, we will demonstrate the validation of PSAT Prius component models and control strategy, using APRF vehicle test data.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0004
P. Sharer, A. Rousseau, S. Pagerit, Y. Wu
Because of their high efficiency and low emissions, fuel-cell vehicles are undergoing extensive research and development. When considering the introduction of advanced vehicles, engineers must perform a well-to-wheel (WTW) evaluation to determine the potential impact of a technology on carbon dioxide and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions and to establish a basis that can be used to compare other propulsion technology and fuel choices. Several modeling tools developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) were used to evaluate the overall environmental and fuel-saving impacts associated with an advanced powertrain configuration. The Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) transient vehicle simulation software was used for pump-to-wheel (PTW) analysis, and GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy use in Transportation) was used for well-to-pump (WTP) analysis. This paper assesses the impact of FreedomCAR vehicle goals on a WTW energy basis.
2001-08-20
Technical Paper
2001-01-2536
Aymeric Rousseau, Sylvain Pagerit, Gilles Monnet, An Feng
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), working with the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), maintains hybrid vehicle simulation software, the PNGV System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT). PSAT, originally proprietary, has been used by both DOE and the “Big Three” as a modeling tool. The number of PSAT users has increased recently because 15 universities participating in the 2001 FutureTruck competition were given the software for their use. PSAT allows companies to look at new types of vehicles (hybrids) and choose the best configuration according to customer expectations within a minimum of time. PSAT, a forward-looking model, allows the user to simulate a large number of different configurations (conventional, series, parallel, and power split). PSAT is well suited for development of control strategies; by using accurate dynamics component models as its code, PSAT can be implemented directly and tested at the bench scale or in a vehicle.
Viewing 1 to 12 of 12