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Viewing 1 to 6 of 6
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2168
Vahid Hosseini, W Neill, Hongsheng Guo, Cosmin Emil Dumitrescu, Wallace Chippior, Craig Fairbridge, Ken Mitchell
The effects of cetane number, aromatics content and 90% distillation temperature (T90) on HCCI combustion were investigated using a fuel matrix designed by the Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) Working Group of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC). The experiments were conducted in a single-cylinder, variable compression ratio, Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine. The fuels were atomized and partially vaporized in the intake manifold. The engine was operated at a relative air/fuel ratio of 1.2, 60% exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and 900 rpm. The compression ratio was varied over the range of 9:1 to 15:1 to optimize the combustion phasing for each fuel, keeping other operating parameters constant. The results show that cetane number and T90 distillation temperature significantly affected the combustion phasing. Cetane number was clearly found to have the strongest effect.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-1107
Vahid Hosseini, W. Stuart Neill, Wallace L. Chippior
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion characteristics of dual-stage autoignition fuels were examined over the speed range of 600 to 1700 rpm using a Cooperative Fuels Research (CFR) engine. A fuel vaporizer was used to preheat and partially vaporize the fuel inside the intake plenum. The air and fuel were well-mixed prior to entering the cylinder. Since low temperature heat release (LTHR) is known to be an important factor that affects HCCI combustion of fuels that exhibit dual-stage autoignition behavior, a detailed heat release analyses were performed on both time and crank angle bases. At the lower and upper speeds, the operating ranges were compared as a function of air/fuel ratio (AFR) and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) from the knocking to misfiring limits. The AFR-EGR operating region was more limited at 1700 rpm than at 900 rpm for the commercial ULSD fuel. Combustion stability was problematic at higher engine speeds.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-3144
W. Stuart Neill, Wallace L. Chippior, Jean Cooley, Mike Doma, Craig Fairbridge, Robert Falkiner, Robert L. McCormick, Ken Mitchell
The exhaust emissions from a single-cylinder version of a heavy-duty diesel engine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) were studied using 12 diesel fuels derived from oil sands and conventional sources. The test fuels were blended from 22 refinery streams to produce four fuels (two from each source) at three different total aromatic levels (10, 20, and 30% by mass). The cetane numbers were held constant at 43. Exhaust emissions were measured using the AVL eight-mode steady-state test procedure. PM emissions were accurately modeled by a single regression equation with two predictors, total aromatics and sulphur content. Sulphate emissions were found to be independent of the type of sulphur compound in the fuel. NOx emissions were accurately modeled by a single regression equation with total aromatics and density as predictor variables. PM and NOx emissions were significantly significantly affected by fuel properties, but crude oil source did not play a role.
2000-06-19
Technical Paper
2000-01-1994
David R. Snelling, Gregory J. Smallwood, Robert A. Sawchuk, W. Stuart Neill, Daniel Gareau, Daniel J. Clavel, Wallace L. Chippior, Fengshan Liu, Ömer L. Gülder, William D. Bachalo
Diesel engines face tightening particulate matter emissions regulations due to the environmental and health effects attributed to these emissions. There is increasing demand for measuring not only the concentration, but also the size distribution of the particulates. Laser-induced incandescence has emerged as a promising technique for measuring spatially and temporally resolved particulate volume fraction and size. Laser-induced incandescence has orders of magnitude more sensitivity than the gravimetric technique, and thus offers the promise of real-time measurements and adds the increasingly desirable size and morphology information. The usefulness of LII as a diagnostic instrument for the precise measurement of particulate concentration and primary particle size has been demonstrated. Measurements have been performed in the exhaust of a single cylinder DI research diesel engine. Simultaneous gravimetric filter measurements were made for direct comparison with the LII technique.
2000-06-19
Technical Paper
2000-01-1856
W. Stuart Neill, Wallace L. Chippior, Ömer L. Gülder, Jean Cooley, E. Keith Richardson, Ken Mitchell, Craig Fairbridge
The influence of fuel aromatics type on the particulate matter (PM) and NOx exhaust emissions of a heavy-duty, single-cylinder, DI diesel engine was investigated. Eight fuels were blended from conventional and oil sands crude oil sources to form five fuel pairs with similar densities but with different poly-aromatic (1.6 to 14.6%) or total aromatic (14.3 to 39.0%) levels. The engine was tuned to meet the U.S. EPA 1994 emission standards. An eight-mode, steady-state simulation of the U.S. EPA heavy-duty transient test procedure was followed. The experimental results show that there were no statistically significant differences in the PM and NOx emissions of the five fuel pairs after removing the fuel sulphur content effect on PM emissions. However, there was a definite trend towards higher NOx emissions as the fuel density, poly-aromatic and total aromatic levels of the test fuels increased.
1999-10-25
Technical Paper
1999-01-3653
David R. Snelling, Gregory J. Smallwood, Robert A. Sawchuk, W. Stuart Neill, Daniel Gareau, Wallace L. Chippior, Fengshan Liu, Ömer L. Gülder, William D. Bachalo
Laser-induced incandescence has emerged as a promising technique for measuring spatially and temporally resolved particulate volume fraction and size. Laser-induced incandescence has orders of magnitude more sensitivity than the gravimetric technique, and thus offers the promise of real-time measurements and adds the increasingly desirable size and morphology information. Particulate matter emissions have been measured by laser-induced incandescence and the standard gravimetric procedure in a mini dilution tunnel connected to the exhaust of a single-cylinder diesel engine. The engine used in this study incorporates features of contemporary medium- to heavy-duty diesel engines and is tuned to meet the U.S. EPA 1994 emission standards. The engine experiments have been run using the AVL 8-mode steady-state simulation of the U.S. EPA heavy-duty transient test procedure.
Viewing 1 to 6 of 6